Skip to main content
#
Reechia Powell Realty Group
Plano Real Estate - Homes for Sale in Plano, Texas
Search Properties in Plano, Allen and Murphy
Plano, Texas Featured Listings
Plano Texas Real Estate Information
Allen Texas Real Estate Information
Murphy Texa Real Estate Information
Plano, Allen, and Murphy Luxury Golf Communities
Plano, Allen, and Murphy Golf Communities
Luxury Gated Communities in Northern Texas
Retirees/Seniors
Buying a home in Plano, Allen or Murphy, Texas
Selling A Home In Plano, Allen or Murphy, Texas
Free Resources in Collin County
Reechia Powell, Reechia Powell Realty Group, Plano, Allen and Murphy Realtor
Real Estate Blog

 Real Estate Blog 
Tuesday, May 31 2011
 As we head from the blooming stage of spring into the heat of summer weather, our thoughts turn to water conservation and yet maintaining a green yard. 

Depending on your point of view, gardening and yard work can either be a necessary evil or a cherished escape into the fresh air. But whether you're a minimalist landscaper or have the greenest of thumbs, the added expense of landscaping water bills can be an unpleasant reality every spring and summer. The tips below are just a few ways you can responsibly make it rain without draining your wallet dry.

Harvest the Downpours

Setting up your own rain barrel is an easy way to save a significant amount of money each season. For every inch of rain that falls on 750 sq ft of roof, you can collect 450 gallons of water. That means many areas can gather upwards of a thousand gallons of water every year. That's water you can use to hydrate your houseplants, flowers, vegetable garden or lawn. In addition to saving you money on water bills, using natural water is environmentally sustainable (cities spend a lot of money and energy treating and pumping water into homes). Plants will also grow better with rainwater compared to chlorinated and fluoridated tap water.

Rain barrels can be fairly easily constructed out of old garbage cans, a few washers, a spigot, caulking, and a hose clamp. By connecting one of your home's downspouts to the barrel, you will harness some of the rain collecting power of your roof. If Do-It-Yourself is not your cup of tea, premade rain barrels can be purchased at most home improvement stores, usually ranging from $100-$200. When setting up your rain barrel, make sure to place it on a platform (bricks, etc.) roughly a foot or so off of the ground to make it easier to fill up watering cans and also to give more pressure if you decide to hook it up to a hose.

Our next post will contain more ideas about conserving water. 

 

Helping you find your home is our goal

Getting you through the process is our expertise!

Reechia & Keith Powell

 

 

Homes in Plano

Posted by: AT 04:20 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
Thursday, May 26 2011

With the recent severe weather conditions we found this information helpful, detailed and want to share it to promote safety and awareness. 

Residents of the city could experience a variety of emergencies including the effects of tornadoes, civil defense and hazardous materials accidents. That is why The City of Plano has an extensive Outdoor Warning System, comprised of thirty-six warning sirens and a system for overriding cable television programming that would be used in the event the public needed to be notified of these situations.

 A central control computer, operated by Public Safety Communications personnel, sends secure digital messages to each siren, telling the sirens when and how to operate.

The City’s policy and criteria for activation of the OWS was developed in coordination with the National Weather Service. It is generally consistent with criteria used in surrounding cities in the Dallas/Fort Worth areas if one or more of these conditions are present: 

         Tornado Warnings from the National Weather Service naming Plano in the path

         Severe Thunderstorm Warnings from the National Weather Service with winds forecast over 73mph

         Hail greater than one-inch in size.

To ensure all systems are operating normally an audible test of the Outdoor Warning System is run on the first Wednesday of each month, at 12:00 noon. The test will not be conducted if there is any city-wide emergency or threatening weather.

What do I do when I hear the warning sirens?

Ø      Remain calm, go inside and seek shelter immediately; turn on your radio or television, or listen to your Weather Alert Radio.

Ø      Listen carefully to the instructions.

Ø      Take whatever action is necessary to protect yourself and your family. Unless told otherwise, stay indoors until the emergency has ended.

Ø      Do not call 9-1-1 to ask why the warning sirens have been activated.  Only call 9-1-1 if you have an emergency to report for Police, Fire or EMS assistance.

Note: In this area WBAP Radio, 820 AM, is the designated Emergency Alert System (EAS) station. Most other radio and television stations will also broadcast information regarding emergencies. Those with cable TV may turn to PTN, Channel A30, for official information from the Plano Warning Center.

Additional Recommendations:

This system is a supplemental warning system, designed to warn those who are outside, or who are in close proximity to a siren. As a supplemental warning system, it may not always be audible inside homes, buildings with a high ambient noise level (such as offices or factories), or when you are sleeping.

As a primary means of warning, Weather Alert Radio Receivers are strongly encouraged for every home and business. They are available from a variety of retailers, and typically cost between $30 and $80. These receivers sit silently until the National Weather Service issues a warning; at which time they give out a loud alarm sound, followed by the specific warning message. The Weather Alert Radios can easily be configured to warn the hearing and visually impaired.

It is imperative that you remain aware of the potential for severe weather, especially during the spring and fall storm seasons. By remaining alert, you can anticipate severe weather, and possible watches or warnings. If the potential for severe weather exists, be prepared. Monitor your Weather Radio or a local radio/television station for updates.

 

What else can I do to be prepared?

1.     A little advanced planning will help you be ready, should an emergency occur.

2.     Prearrange a safe meeting place inside your home. You will want to find an interior room on the ground floor, with no windows or exterior doors.

3.     Keep blankets, water, non-perishable food, flashlight, and personal hygiene items readily accessible.

4.     Have your driver’s license, checkbook, credit cards and cash ready.

5.     Make sure your car has at least a half tank of gas at all times.

6.     If you have one, keep your cellular telephone fully charged and ready to use.

7.     Most emergencies are short-lived, but having made some simple advance plans will help ensure your safety.

Information obtained from Plano City site, a map of siren locations and an audio link can be found on this site.

Your Plano Neighbors,

Keith & Reechia Powell

Posted by: Reechia & Keith Powell AT 07:32 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Wednesday, May 25 2011

Get Help

One of the most important moving tips: you don't have to do it alone.

Move with the Pros:

A professional moving company can take the care of all the hard work, leaving you to kick back and supervise. If you feel like avoiding the packing stage as well, most companies will pack your items for an additional fee. Prices and reliability can vary widely between companies, so compare quotes from at least three local companies before choosing a moving company. Don't rely on over-the-phone price quotes from the moving company you select: make sure the moving company comes to your home to accurately assess the space and approximate weight of your shipment. Make sure to check their history with the Better Business Bureau or American Moving & Storage Association.

Moving Consultant:

If the mere sight of a cardboard box leaves you feeling overwhelmed, consider hiring someone to handle the nitty-gritty of your move. These consultants are the relocation industry's answer to wedding planners and travel agents -- they can arrange for movers, pack your stuff, switch over your utilities, and transfer school and medical records. If you can swing the price tag, or if your company is covering relocation costs, a consultant can make your move relatively stress-free.

Portable storage:

Companies like PODS, U Haul and 1-800-PACKRAT will deliver a portable storage unit right outside your door. Before making the call, make sure you have enough parking on your property to accommodate the size of the temporary storage unit. Fill the storage space at your own pace. When you're finally ready to move, give the service a call and they will deliver the storage pod to your new home. Portable storage units still force you to do all the work, but they are a low cost solution and can serve as an alternative if there is a gap between the time you need to leave your old home and can access the new property.

Rental trucks:

Renting a box truck can be a cost-effective alternative to hiring a moving company -- as long as you plan ahead. A 10-foot moving truck will generally hold an apartment's worth of stuff; while a 24-foot truck can accommodate a three-bedroom house. It's best to choose a larger truck; you won't have to cram items into a smaller space, and for cross-town moves you will avoid wasting time on multiple trips. Read the fine print about mileage allowances and fuel surcharges, and make sure you know the rules regarding when and where you can return the truck. Depending on the size of the truck and length of the move, you may consider adding supplemental insurance through the rental company in the event of dings or dents to the truck.

Friends and family:

Free labor is great, but you'll likely still need to rent a moving truck (unless everyone in your family has a super duty pickup). Make sure you have every possible detail taken care of before your volunteer labor force shows up; the last thing you want is to leave your friends and family waiting while you pack the last boxes or run to go pick up the rental truck. Ask friends and family to help with packing and loading to a reasonable degree, and expect to return the favor when it's their turn to move. And common courtesy calls for you to provide lunch and refreshments for your friendly work crew.

See Moving - Before Moving Day

Posted by: Reechia Powell AT 04:27 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Monday, May 23 2011

In our last post we discussed some strategies for packing before your move, today we will talk about the actual Moving Day. 

Before Moving Day

Keep People Updated:

Contact or visit your local Post Office to obtain a Change of Address form. You can also obtain this form online at http://www.usps.com.

Give a change of address to the following: banks, schools, friends & family, insurance companies, doctors and specialists, cell phone providers, credit card companies and magazine and newspaper subscriptions.

Clean in Waves:

Trying to clean your whole house at once (either before or after moving day) can be an overwhelming prospect. Instead, begin cleaning any rooms in your house that have been emptied such as closets, basements or attics. Once a room is clean close the door, this will be a sign that you are done with that room and will help keep it clean as you continue through the rest of the home. 

Get Help

One of the most important moving tips: you don't have to do it alone.

Move with the Pros:

A professional moving company can take the care of all the hard work, leaving you to kick back and supervise. If you feel like avoiding the packing stage as well, most companies will pack your items for an additional fee. Prices and reliability can vary widely between companies, so compare quotes from at least three local companies before choosing a moving company. Don't rely on over-the-phone price quotes from the moving company you select: make sure the moving company comes to your home to accurately assess the space and approximate weight of your shipment. Make sure to check their history with the Better Business Bureau or American Moving & Storage Association.

Moving Consultant:

If the mere sight of a cardboard box leaves you feeling overwhelmed, consider hiring someone to handle the nitty-gritty of your move. These consultants are the relocation industry's answer to wedding planners and travel agents -- they can arrange for movers, pack your stuff, switch over your utilities, and transfer school and medical records. If you can swing the price tag, or if your company is covering relocation costs, a consultant can make your move relatively stress-free.

Portable storage:

Companies like PODS, U Haul and 1-800-PACKRAT will deliver a portable storage unit right outside your door. Before making the call, make sure you have enough parking on your property to accommodate the size of the temporary storage unit. Fill the storage space at your own pace. When you're finally ready to move, give the service a call and they will deliver the storage pod to your new home. Portable storage units still force you to do all the work, but they are a low cost solution and can serve as an alternative if there is a gap between the time you need to leave your old home and can access the new property.

Rental trucks:

Renting a box truck can be a cost-effective alternative to hiring a moving company -- as long as you plan ahead. A 10-foot moving truck will generally hold an apartment's worth of stuff; while a 24-foot truck can accommodate a three-bedroom house. It's best to choose a larger truck; you won't have to cram items into a smaller space, and for cross-town moves you will avoid wasting time on multiple trips. Read the fine print about mileage allowances and fuel surcharges, and make sure you know the rules regarding when and where you can return the truck. Depending on the size of the truck and length of the move, you may consider adding supplemental insurance through the rental company in the event of dings or dents to the truck.

Friends and family:

Free labor is great, but you'll likely still need to rent a moving truck (unless everyone in your family has a super duty pickup). Make sure you have every possible detail taken care of before your volunteer labor force shows up; the last thing you want is to leave your friends and family waiting while you pack the last boxes or run to go pick up the rental truck. Ask friends and family to help with packing and loading to a reasonable degree, and expect to return the favor when it's their turn to move. And common courtesy calls for you to provide lunch and refreshments for your friendly work crew.

After the Truck is Loaded

Once you have everything packed away into the trucks, you'll want to pass through your house and check off a few final items before getting on to your new home.

Damage Control: Check for any damages to walls, doors or frames caused by furniture being moved. The last hassle you need is to lose part of your security deposit or have any issues with the homebuyers because your furniture dinged a door frame or left a scratch in the wall.

Leave Behinds: Re-check the house for anything you might have accidently forgotten. Look through the attic, all closets, the garage, any crawl spaces, the medicine cabinet, and the drawer under your oven.

Now you can begin unloading in your new home and enjoying it!  

Other moving day hints & tips.

Helping you find your home is our goal

Getting you through the process is our expertise!

Reechia & Keith Powell

 

Homes for Sale in Allen

See Moving - Tips & Hints for a Successful Move
Posted by: AT 01:40 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
Thursday, May 19 2011
As we head into the summer many people will be moving, some across town, others across country, here are some our best hints and tips. 

Cut Back

Moving can be a difficult task. Don't make it more work than necessary by moving furniture, clothing, art or other belongings that you don't actually want or need anymore. Look for opportunities to de-clutter your life and get rid of excess possessions.

Hand it Down: Tell your friends and family you're paring down possessions. You'll feel better, and it'll be easier giving up that expensive couch or antique bureau if you know your best friend will make good use of it.

Yard Sale: The tried and true yard sale can help you get rid of things you don't use and avoid paying to move them. As a bonus, you'll make some extra cash that you can spend on new things in your next home.

Donate: Consider donating unwanted or unsold items to charity. Many charitable causes have free pickup services for donations that make giving your unwanted furniture and items as easy as picking up the phone and scheduling a pickup time.

Packing

The thought of organizing and packing up a house's worth of clothing, kitchenware, and other items can be daunting to say the least. Even if you are using professional movers, you likely will want to pack and organize certain items yourself. By having a packing strategy, you can make it through the first stage of the move with your sanity intact and avoid last minute panic as the moving trucks pull up.

Inventory: Taking a rough inventory of your stuff will give you a general idea of how many moving boxes you will need. If you will be using a moving company, it's not a bad idea to make a written or photographic inventory to make sure you don't lose anything during the move.

Box Right: Make use of suitcases and plastic storage tubs you already own before searching out moving boxes. You can re-use old cardboard moving boxes, but make sure the cardboard is still in good shape rather than risk damaging any of your items. Purchase frame boxes to protect your pictures and mirrors.

Other Supplies: Purchase high-quality packing tape and plenty of bubble wrap to help safeguard your belongings during the move. Specialty packing paper or packing fill can be used for box fill instead of newspaper to remove the risk of scratching fragile items.

If you will be moving on your own, you should rent furniture pads, straps and furniture dollies from the rental truck company.

Have a Packing Plan: Begin by packing the items you use least often. Pack one room at a time, making sure to clearly label the contents and which room they are intended for. You can also use a numbering or color coded system to help indicate which boxes have the most frequently used items.

Pack Smart: Large boxes should be filled with lighter items such as clothing. Save heavy items like books and dishes for smaller boxes that will allow for easy lifting. Make sure each box is packed full, but also check the weight of packed boxes before sealing.

"Essentials" Box: Pack one box to keep close at hand (i.e., not buried in the back of the moving truck). The idea is to have easy access to items you may need during the move or immediately after your arrival at the new home.

        ID - Your wallet, checkbook and/or ATM card

        Bottled water

        Toothbrush, toothpaste and soap

        Any prescription medications, Aspirin and other over the counter medication

        Snacks that don't require refrigeration or cooking (granola bars, nuts, etc) 

        Paper cups, paper plates and plastic utensils

        Towels, sheets, toilet paper, paper towels

        Scissors and tape

        Closing documents if you're buying a new home

        Important files; Medical records

        Pet food and pet littler, if applicable

 

Now that you are working on packing, in our next note we will talk about things to do before moving day arrives.   

Helping you find your home is our goal

Getting you through the process is our expertise!

Reechia & Keith Powell

Plano Real Estate

Posted by: Reechia & Keith Powell AT 03:53 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Site Mailing List 

Reechia Powell

Reechia Powell Realty Group
301 S. Watters Road #100
Allen, TX 75013
Phone: (972) 979-9978
Email: Reechia@Reechia.com

REALTORŪ



Site Map

TERMS OF USE - PRIVACY POLICY - CONTACT POLICY

Copyright© 2007-2009 Reechia Powell, REALTOR®, All Rights Reserved.
Reechia.com
 
 

Pro Step Marketing

 
 
Site Powered By
    prostepmarketing.com
    Online web site design

Real Estate Blog
Latest Posts
Archive